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Your Drugs and You

Taking your medicine as prescribed by a doctor or pharmacist is important for controlling chronic conditions, treating temporary conditions, and overall long-term health and well-being. A personal connection with your health-care provider or pharmacist is an important part of medication adherence. You should be able to ask questions about your ailment and drug treatment plan. You should always stick to your medication routine – taking your medications as prescribed – the right dose, at the right time, in the right way and frequency.

 

 

 

WAYS TO KEEP TRACK
. Take your medications at the same time every day.
. Tie taking your medications with a daily routine like brushing your teeth or getting ready for bed. Before choosing mealtime for your routine, check if your medication should be taken on a full or empty stomach.
. Keep a “medicine calendar” with your pill bottles and note each time you take a dose.
. Use a pill container. Some types have sections for multiple doses at different times, such as morning, lunch, evening, and night.
. When using a pill container, refill it at the same time each week.

For example, every Sunday morning after breakfast.
. Purchase timer caps for your pill bottles and set them to go off when your next dose is due. Some pill boxes also have timer functions.
. When travelling, be certain to bring enough of your medication, plus a few days extra, in case your return is delayed.
. If you’re flying, keep your medication in your carry-on bag to avoid loss with luggage.

 

 

 

 

 

TAKING MEDICINES SAFELY
Here are some tips to help you take your medicines safely:
. Follow instructions. Read all medicine labels. Make sure to take your medicines the right way.
. Use the right amount. Don’t take a larger dose of a medicine thinking it will help you more. It can be very dangerous, even deadly.
. Take medicine on time. You can set timers and write reminders to take your medication.
. Turn on a light. Don’t take medicine in the dark; otherwise, you might make a mistake.
. Report problems. Call your doctor right away if you have any trouble with your prescription, experience side effects, or if you are worried that it might be doing more harm than good.
. Avoid drinking alcohol. Some medicines may not work correctly or may make you sick if alcohol is in your body.
. Check before stopping. Take prescription medicine until it’s finished or until your doctor says it’s all right to stop.
. Don’t share. Do not take medicines prescribed for another person or give yours to someone else.

SIDE EFFECTS
Unwanted or unexpected symptoms or feelings that occur when you take medicine are called side effects.

Side effects can be relatively minor, such as a headache or a dry mouth. They can also be life-threatening, such as severe bleeding or irreversible damage to the liver or kidneys. Medications’ side effects also can affect your driving.

Want to know more about your drugs, its uses and side effect? Need a drug refill or request? Call Healthboxes on 09091111129 or 08097560000 to speak with one of our pharmacist and know more about your prescription.

REFERENCES
https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/safe-use-medicines-older-adults
https://www.fda.gov/drugs/special-features/why-you-need-take-your-medications-prescribed-or-instructed

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